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Keeping It Eclectic

Keeping It Eclectic

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Welcome to Willo: Located in downtown Phoenix, the Willo Historic District features a number of architecturally significant homes, among them this 1930s-era single-story with a distinct Southwest flavor. It’s a popular stop along the district’s annual tour of homes. “The whole house is pretty much in its original state,” says Melinda Dalacas. It was important that its historic charm remain intact with the addition of a new portable spa. The homeowner had two chief prerequisites: “It needs to have character and it needs to fit with the house,” she says. But how do you incorporate a sleek modern tub with a whimsical collection of antiques, wash basins and little raised vegetable gardens? Simple: Surround the spa in a stucco ramada that matches the home and offers curtains for privacy. The shade structure above looks deceptively like wood, but it’s actually metal. “It never needs to be refinished or serviced,” says Robert Owens. The spa is partially inground, allowing for ease of entrance.

Brick by brick: New pavers went right over the existing pad. “That saved a lot of money on the demolition of all that concrete,” Owens says. They also closely match the red clay bricks that the homeowner salvaged from homes that were set to be bulldozed to make way for a highway. Those bricks, each a piece of history, now line the driveway, creating a uniform appearance between the front and back of the home.