Schechner’s Sports Stop is a

regular feature of the Pool and Spa News enewsletter. The

opinions expressed herein are solely those of Managing Editor Dan

Schechner, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Pool and

Spa News, its parent company or affiliates. Any similarities to

actual, well-conceived opinions are purely coincidental and likely

of a fleeting nature. In other words, this is for entertainment

purposes only. 
Schechner’s Sports Stop is a regular feature of the Pool and Spa News enewsletter. The opinions expressed herein are solely those of Managing Editor Dan Schechner, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Pool and Spa News, its parent company or affiliates. Any similarities to actual, well-conceived opinions are purely coincidental and likely of a fleeting nature. In other words, this is for entertainment purposes only. 

In a positively Nixonian turn of events, the NFL’s New York Jets have indefinitely suspended their strength and conditioning coach over an incident that’s straight out of 6th grade phys. ed.

On Dec. 11, against the division rival Miami Dolphins, Sal Alosi formed a wall on his team’s sideline with a handful of inactive players. The idea was to create an obstruction that would prevent opposing players from shooting up-field on kick-offs and punt returns.

But Alosi, in his infinite idiocy, went a step further and extended his knee when the Dolphins’ Nolan Carroll crossed his path. Carroll, whose mother also happens to be the newly elected lieutenant governor of Florida, went down, but was fortunate to escape serious injury.

Alosi copped to a momentary brain freeze during a post-game press conference, but to little avail: The Jets quickly fined and suspended him, without pay, for the remainder of the season. Alosi’s punishment increased days later after evidence surfaced that the wall had been carefully orchestrated, likely for weeks.

But what’s really interesting, to me at least, is how Jets special teams coordinator Mike Westhoff and head coach Rex Ryan have distanced themselves from the situation. Neither has claimed a shred of foreknowledge about Alosi’s tactics — sort of a lone-gunman defense.

Now the NFL is stepping in. The league is expected to determine soon whether additional punishment should be handed down for Alosi’s actions, as well as for comments Westhoff made about the New England Patriots doing the same thing. Way to take the high road, Mike.

Anyway, the question is this: Is it even possible Alosi acted alone? And if he did, should he ever be allowed to work in the league again? Or, what are the odds this scheme reaches into the highest office of the land, i.e. Ryan’s? Is Alosi taking the fall?

As always, I invite your feedback.